Automotive lab scope ?

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Automotive lab scope ?

Post by Guest » Sun May 02, 2004 3:00 pm

Hi, I am considering buying the automotive labscope kit but the laptop i'm using at the moment is rather old. How will this affect the performance of the scope?. From memory its a pentium 133 , 32MB memory, running windows 95. thanks Davidwag

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Autonerdz
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Post by Autonerdz » Sun May 02, 2004 4:17 pm

Hi David,

The memory and performance is in the PicoScope box. Your systam will run it, but you will be limited to the old software. The new software version requires Windows 98SE or higher.

This means that you will not be able to open and view files saved with the newer version. You could get started with it and then upgrade later. You probably will want to upgrade that PC soon anyway.

:shock:
Tom Roberts
(The Picotologist)
http://www.autonerdz.com
skype: autonerdz
THE PicoScope Automotive Authority
In North America

davidwag

Post by davidwag » Sun May 09, 2004 7:52 am

Hi, If I have to upgrade my laptop to be able to use the latest software the cost comes close to many stand alone scopes such as Fluke Scopemeter, what advantage does picoscope offer this type of scope?
Thanks Davidwag

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Post by Autonerdz » Sun May 09, 2004 3:29 pm

Hi David,

You have a point. You can do a lot more with your computer than use it for a scope though.

Not sure what Fluke model you are referring to. Looking at the 190 series specs show that even the ADC 212/3 has some advantages.

The Fluke is an 8 bit scope and the 212/3 is a 12 bit scope. This means that the 212/3 has superior vertical resolution and accuracy.

Horizontally, the Fluke has a 1200 point record length per channel and the 212/3 shares a 32,000 point record length between the two channels. This provides more samples on a screen so that you have a more accurate reconstruction with much greater detail.

All instruments have different limitations. The Fluke has a much faster processor but that would only become an advantage at very short time bases. We use long time bases in automotive. The Fluke has a pulse width trigger too, that the 212/3 does not.

The hand held unit is more convenient but being PC based has some clear advantages as well. Storage and printing are a snap and you have a huge hard drive you can record screens to. Also, since each saved capture is also a preset, the number of presets is virtually unlimited. In addition, the large PC screen display makes viewing much more pleasant, especially for us older folks. :shock:
Tom Roberts
(The Picotologist)
http://www.autonerdz.com
skype: autonerdz
THE PicoScope Automotive Authority
In North America

davidwag

Post by davidwag » Sun May 09, 2004 8:49 pm

Hi, thanks for your reply and advise
Davidwag

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Post by Autonerdz » Wed May 12, 2004 7:02 pm

Hi David,

I did some more checking, and I understand the software will work fine back to Windows 95 but, if you need the USB communication, you'll have to have 98SE or higher.

As long as you are using the standard parallel communication, you should be fine.
Tom Roberts
(The Picotologist)
http://www.autonerdz.com
skype: autonerdz
THE PicoScope Automotive Authority
In North America

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