View nearby waveforms after trigger

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Edwallace2
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View nearby waveforms after trigger

Post by Edwallace2 » Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:18 pm

I frequently would like to view the waveforms immediately before and/or after a triggered waveform, using my PicoScope 2104.

Using the latest Waveform Buffer feature only the previous triggered waveforms can be viewed, is there a way to view the immediate previous/next waveforms, after the capturing has been stopped?
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The following is an image I have created to describe my need (also attached).

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pico_capture_buffer.jpg
An image I have created to describe my need.
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Robin
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Post by Robin » Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:05 am

Hello

Each waveform has to include a trigger event, unless you are using auto-trigger or have triggering disabled.

You can increase your timebase (and use horizontal zoom and scroll) to view more data either side of your trigger point.

Robin

Erik
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Post by Erik » Tue Apr 21, 2009 6:54 am

The 2000 series are low memory scopes, I assume that the detail (sampling rate) you need, limits your time across the screen. This is a limitation of the hardware of your product.

You can try playing with trigger delay to see the data behind each trigger point but you will still have missing data between captures.

If you need to capture all the data with the same detail you need a deep memory scope, i.e. PS4000 with 32 MS or PS5000 with 128 MS. With those products you can sample data at high speed for an extended period of time using a single buffer.

Edwallace2
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Solved!

Post by Edwallace2 » Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:16 pm

I eventually thought of a neat solution; use the None trigger, and configure PicoScope to use a large Waveform Buffer (such as 500).

Now start capturing, and ensure that your signal is on the scope's input pin. Stop capturing after you think you "caught" the part of the signal you want to analyze.

Its slow work from here on; you have to navigate through the waveform buffer, until you find what you're looking for!

(Tip: type in a number in the buffer text field to jump to that buffered waveform)

Best regards,
Edward.

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