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Cathodic protection rectifier troubleshooting

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Cathodic protection rectifier troubleshooting

Postby mike » Tue May 17, 2005 1:16 am

I have a rectifier that has 47.7 volts dc output but no mV or mA reading across the shunt. What kind of problem should I be looking for.
mike
 

Postby Sarah » Wed May 18, 2005 8:39 am

Hi

Thank you for your post.

Unfortunately we are unable to help you with this. You may find someone else on here can.

Best Regards
Sarah
 

Re: Cathodic protection rectifier troubleshooting

Postby rsaleme » Tue Aug 16, 2005 2:51 pm

mike wrote:I have a rectifier that has 47.7 volts dc output but no mV or mA reading across the shunt. What kind of problem should I be looking for.


Mike,

You should be measuring dc mv across the shunt to verify your current output of the rectifier. Do you have a current reading on your ammeter? If you also have zero amps reading on ammeter, the first thing you want to do is verify your rectifier is working correctly. I would be happy to go thru process with you on verifying your rectifier is working correctly.

You can reach me at 1-888-321-0966 or e-mail me at rsaleme@dnrelectric.com

Roxanne
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Postby Guest » Sat Mar 04, 2006 4:15 am

Broken DC negative cable, high resistance connection, or DC fuse.
Guest
 

Re: Cathodic protection rectifier troubleshooting

Postby Guest » Thu Apr 27, 2006 1:55 pm

mike wrote:I have a rectifier that has 47.7 volts dc output but no mV or mA reading across the shunt. What kind of problem should I be looking for.


Mike - I will assume that there is nothing wrong with your shunt, ie. it was working before. In that case, remember that the current you get is the result of the your voltage and resistance (ohms law tells you that). Since you have voltage (and a lot of it) its telling me that your resistance is too high. What coud cause this high resistance? A very common problem is for either the anode or cathode cables to be broken or disconnected from the circuit.

I would first check the posts where the anode and cathode cables are connected to on the rectifier. Make sure that the cables ares securely fastened to the posts (with the power off of course). If so, most times the cathode cable may have been cut. If you suspect this then try to see if you can run a new cathode cable to the rectifier from the pipe and try the rectifier again.

Things can get very complicated if the problem lies on the anode side of the circuit. If the anodes are very old it could be that they have all been consumed and represent a very high resistance. If you know that the anodes were in good condition (based on your recent records indicating a sizeable current output) then it could mean that the header cable was cut or broken. If it wasn't cut by mechanical means it could have had a small cut in the insulation when it was installed and the cable has since corroded. This happens sometimes because in an impressed current system you are driving the current and the anode wire acts as part of the anode. Hope this helps. -gil
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Re: Cathodic protection rectifier troubleshooting

Postby mehtab shah » Fri Jul 29, 2016 6:27 am

I have a rectifier that has 40 volts dc output but no mV or mA reading across the shunt. What kind of problem should I be looking for. detail is that when i apply only 2 volt DC there is no mV across Shunt but the value of permanent reference electrode come to fulfill value -850 mV what it mean?
other hand when i increase dc Volt like 10 to 15 volt the value of reference cell also increase 5 to 6 volt in that case the value of shunt mV display . 0.6 to 0.9 mV.
what problem i face please reply me
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